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Sunday, March 11, 2018

Peppersoup loading: Residents pose with huge turtle caught in Bayelsa State

Peppersoup loading: Residents pose with huge turtle caught in Bayelsa State lailasnews

Sources claim that the sea-dwelling animal, might have already been killed and shared among the villagers


Residents of Famgbe in Yenagoa local government area of Bayelsa State, happily posed with a huge turtle that was caught in the area earlier today.

Sources claim that the sea-dwelling animal, might have already been killed and shared among the villagers. Here are photos below;

Peppersoup loading: Residents pose with huge turtle caught in Bayelsa State lailasnews 1

Peppersoup loading: Residents pose with huge turtle caught in Bayelsa State lailasnews 2

Peppersoup loading: Residents pose with huge turtle caught in Bayelsa State lailasnews 3

Peppersoup loading: Residents pose with huge turtle caught in Bayelsa State lailasnews 4

Well here are basic facts about sea turtles;
Sea turtles are one of the Earth’s most ancient creatures. The seven species that can be found today have been around for 110  million years, since the time of the dinosaurs. The sea turtle’s shell, or “carapace” is streamlined for swimming through the water. Unlike other turtles, sea turtles cannot retract their legs and head into their shells. Their color varies between yellow, greenish and black depending on the species.

DIET

What sea turtles eat depends on the subspecies, but some common items include jellyfish, seaweed, crabs, shrimp, sponges, snails, algae and mollusks.

POPULATION

It is difficult to find population numbers for sea turtles because male and juvenile sea turtles do not return to shore once they hatch and reach the ocean, which makes it hard to keep track of them.

RANGE

Sea turtles are found in all warm and temperate waters throughout the world and migrate hundreds of miles between nesting and feeding grounds. Most sea turtles undergo long migrations, some as far as 1400 miles, between their feeding grounds and the beaches where they nest.

BEHAVIOR

Sea turtles spend most of their lives in the water, where not much information can be gathered on their behavior. Most of what is known about sea turtle behavior is obtained by observing hatchlings and females that leave the water to lay eggs. Sea turtles, like salmon, will return to the same nesting grounds at which they were born. When females come to the shore they dig out a nest in the ground with their back flippers, bury their clutch of eggs and return to the ocean. After hatching, the young may take as long as a week to dig themselves out of the nest. They emerge at night, move toward the ocean and remain there, solitary, until it is time to mate.

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